Wide Eyed in India: Pt. X

Saturday.

After many days of activity, this day of unwinding was thoroughly welcome. 

Cold showers & 30's jazz & a blessedly present breeze soothed my mind into quiet reflection.

I found myself in Hyderabad once more, in an apartment high enough up in the hills to catch a little of the breeze that proved so elusive in the lowlands. 

The neighborhood was one of the wealthiest in Hyderabad...which is to say that four story palaces found themselves competing with tiny, tarp-roofed shacks & apartment buildings for supremacy. 

Midday came with North Indian style Thali shared with my incredible host Sean at a nice place in the neighborhood...and even finished off the meal with a milkshake! ....Or....well...a scoop of ice cream in some milk. Basically the same thing I suppose. 

With rather more food than I was accustomed to in my belly, we headed out for an afternoon of right proper tourism at the seven tombs of the Mughal Dynasty that once ruled Hyderabad....

Along the way I befriended a really sweet family that timidly came up and asked for a photo...after a quick snap and a bit of conversation, we went our separate ways. It's a shame though, they seem to have forgotten to write me about it... 
Shortly after two rambunctious middle-schoolers proceeded to do the same thing, but with much less veiled enthusiasm!

I went back up into Sean's neighborhood for the latter half of the afternoon,
 ending up wandering until dusk; making portraits and taking pleasure in the simple act of moving. 


To Begin Anew...

Over the past few months, the idea of some sort of creative renewal came into my mind. In the end, I decided to go "back to the basics" and shoot a good portion of my work on medium format film, as I feel it provides an aesthetic very well suited to my style of shooting, particularly with portraits. So from now on, I'll be shooting a portion of every portrait shoot I do on my recently acquired Bronica ETRS. 
I'm incredibly excited for this slight shift in approach, and think it will help me further my quest for making impact-filled images.

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